This study will investigate the importance of non-pay aspects within the reward structure for nurses in the U.K. A crucial requirement of the current modernisation of the National Health Service (NHS) is the supply of an adequate number of nurses.

A key policy question is whether an increase in resources devoted to recruiting and retaining nurses is best spent on wages or upon improving working conditions. There is some evidence of the effect of wages on nursing labour supply, but little on the value placed by nurses on working conditions. Working conditions may become a more important policy instrument in the future with the introduction of the new more uniform pay structures agreed in ‘Agenda for Change’.

This study will distinguish the ‘price’ that nurses are willing to pay to improve their working conditions. It will identify how nurses trade-off pay against other working conditions. As such, it will be the first study to use Discrete Choice Experiments to elicit nurses’ preferences for their employment characteristics.



Start date
01 December 2005
End date
30 March 2009
Grant holder
Dr Diane Skatun
Co-applicants
Professor Alister Scott
Professor Robert Elliott
Grant amount
£113,722.94
Grant reference
RES-000-23-1240
Discipline
Economics
Grant type