Title
To what extent has climate change contributed to the recent epidemiology of tick-borne diseases?
Description
There is no doubt that all vector-borne diseases are very sensitive to climatic conditions. Many such diseases have shown marked increases in both distribution and incidence during the past few decades, just as human-induced climate change is thought to have exceeded random fluctuations. This coincidence has led to the general perception that climate change has driven disease emergence, but climate change is the inevitable backdrop for all recent events, without implying causality.
URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2009.09.011
URL Description
Abstract
DOI
10.1016/j.vetpar.2009.09.011
Language
English
Author
Sarah E. Randolph

encephalitis; baltics; climatic changes; tick-borne diseases; political transition; human behaviour

Volume number
167
Issue number
02 April 2017
Is this item peer reviewed?
Yes
ISSN
0304-4017
Copyright URL
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/authorsview.authors/fundingbodyagreements
Publisher
Elsevier
Date of publication
10 February 2010
Number of pages
2
Page reference
92-94
Place of publication
Amsterdam
Is this item a pre-print or post-print?
Post-print
Title of journal
Veterinary parasitology
Harvard
Randolph, Sarah E (2010) To what extent has climate change contributed to the recent epidemiology of tick-borne diseases?. Veterinary parasitology. 167 (2-4), pp. 92-94 Amsterdam: Elsevier.
Vancouver
Randolph Sarah E. To what extent has climate change contributed to the recent epidemiology of tick-borne diseases?. Veterinary parasitology 2010; 167 (2-4): 92-94.